What is E2B and Why we do it

 

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Narrator: …so without further ado, but first, Professor Shanahan, the floor is yours.

Professor Shanahan: Hello. I’m very excited to be able to share some time with you this afternoon. I’ve been asked to talk to you about a unique approach to learning that we use in our MBA program, and we use this both in our on-ground as well as our online delivery method. And we call this program E2B – Education to Business. I’ll talk to you – before I begin – and talk to you a little bit more about kind of what it is, it’s important to give you some context for why we use it and what it is.

PS: So I’d like to introduce you to a little educational theory. See that come up on the slide there? Absolutely, so faculty in developing their syllabi, the courses that you’ll be – the materials that we comprise and the learning objectives that we develop to deliver a course to you are guided by the ed – taxonomies used to develop the theories of educational objectives. So on your screen – and Bloom’s is one of the taxonomies that most faculty rely on, so I’m going to tell you a little bit about this Bloom’s taxonomy.

PS: In 1956 Benjamin Bloom was an educational psychologist at the University of Chicago, and he developed what you’re seeing in front of you – this kind of taxonomy of learning. It begins with this lower order learning and moves into this higher order learning skills. His graduate assistant at the time – Lorin Anderson in the 1990′s worked with another colleague, Dave Krathwohl, and together they revised this taxonomy, creating this series of verbs, rather than nouns, so as you see on the bottom of your screen, the first thing that you do when you come in contact with some new educational materials is that you’ll have to kind of read and certainly be able to recall and remember that.

PS: And as you begin to work around that material, you’ll develop a greater level of understanding, being able to learn how to apply it. You’ll perhaps put that to use in an assignment or task where you’ll have the opportunity to analyze some outcomes, looking at the application of that concept or theory. Evaluate the potential outcomes, again moving up that hierarchy and perhaps having the opportunity to then work on a special project where you get to apply and create something, evolving that theory into practical application.

PS: So that is where we try and work very heavily, that top end, those purple bars, or blue depending upon the color of your screen. Really advancing your graduate work to help you through the activities and assignments that we compile on our syllabus to develop those higher-order thinking skills. And this is really where our E2B program helps us deliver on this.

PS: There’s lots of different ways that you can go about consuming content in the courses, and we can go about delivering it. We call them multiple teaching methods. Some of them are more passive as you’re seeing – lectures, reading, audio-visual, demonstrations. Some are more participatory. Group discussions, practice and teaching others. The more participatory the method as you’re seeing there in the percentage, the higher the levels of retention. And so, as much as I’d like to say I’m incredibly interesting, and every word that I’m saying , you’re going to recall three weeks from now, reality is that you’ll probably recall less than 5% of this. But if I had you do something or teach someone else, or if you share this and explain what went on in the seminar to a colleague or friend, your retention level of this material will go up greatly.

PS: There’s lots of different ways that you can go about consuming content in the courses, and we can go about delivering it. We call them multiple teaching methods. Some of them are more passive as you’re seeing – lectures, reading, audio-visual, demonstrations. Some are more participatory. Group discussions, practice and teaching others. The more participatory the method as you’re seeing there in the percentage, the higher the levels of retention. And so, as much as I’d like to say I’m incredibly interesting, and every word that I’m saying , you’re going to recall three weeks from now, reality is that you’ll probably recall less than 5% of this. But if I had you do something or teach someone else, or if you share this and explain what went on in the seminar to a colleague or friend, your retention level of this material will go up greatly.

PS: Now there’s lots of different ways that you’re going to experience – that we’re going to deliver experiential learning, not just live case studies. Role playing, you can certainly do some internships or projects in your own organization, simulations, exercises, but as you see at the top, this idea of consulting projects – this is what we have really found to be incredibly efficacious in delivering very strong learning outcomes.

PS: Now, knowledge is created through this transformation of experience and through that, you develop this idea of self-efficacy. Of belief in oneself and confidence in your knowledge and your ability to be able to use that skill in your own jobs and in your own careers. And this idea of contextual learning, applying what you’re learning at a point of interaction, where you can really begin to adapt it to that given situation.

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